Posts Tagged ‘North Korea’

U.N. has exhausted options on North Korea – Haley

 U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said on Sunday the U.N. Security Council has run out of options on containing North Korea’s nuclear program and the United States may have to turn the matter over to the Pentagon.

“We have pretty much exhausted all the things that we can do at the Security Council at this point,” Haley told CNN’s “State of the Union,” adding that she was perfectly happy to hand the North Korea problem over to Defense Secretary James Mattis.

As world leaders head to the United Nations headquarters in New York for the annual General Assembly meeting this week, Haley’s comments indicated the United States was not backing down from its threat of military action against North Korea.

North Korea launched a missile over Japan into the Pacific Ocean on Thursday in defiance of new U.N. Security Council sanctions banning its textile exports and capping imports of crude oil.

China has urged the United States to refrain from making threats to North Korea. Asked about President Donald Trump’s warning last month that the North Korean threat to the United States will be met with “fire and fury,” Haley said, “It was not an empty threat.”

“If North Korea keeps on with this reckless behavior, if the United States has to defend itself or defend its allies in any way, North Korea will be destroyed. And we all know that. And none of us want that. None of us want war,” she said on CNN.

“We’re trying every other possibility that we have, but there’s a whole lot of military options on the table,” she said.

Pyongyang has launched dozens of missiles as it accelerates a weapons program designed to provide the ability to target the United States with a powerful, nuclear-tipped missile.

North Korea said on Saturday it aimed to reach an “equilibrium” of military force with the United States.

‘ROCKET MAN’

Trump plans to meet with South Korean President Jae-in Moon on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly.

“I spoke with President Moon of South Korea last night. Asked him how Rocket Man is doing. Long gas lines forming in North Korea. Too bad!” Trump said in a Twitter post on Sunday morning.

White House national security adviser H.R. McMaster said on Friday, after the latest North Korean missile launch, that the United States was running out of patience: “We’ve been kicking the can down the road, and we’re out of road.”

On Sunday, he warned of imminent danger from Pyongyang.

“This regime is so close now to threatening the United States and others with a nuclear weapon, that we really have to move with a great sense of urgency on sanctions, on diplomacy and preparing, if necessary, a military option,” McMaster told the “Fox News Sunday” program.

Military options available to Trump range from a sea blockade aimed at enforcing sanctions to cruise missile strikes on nuclear and missile facilities to a broader campaign aimed at overthrowing leader Kim Jong Un.

Mattis has warned the consequences of any military action would be “tragic on an unbelievable scale” and bring severe risk to U.S. ally South Korea.

Democratic U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein said on Sunday that Trump should not rule out talks with North Korea before it agrees to end its nuclear program.

“I think that North Korea is not going to give up its program with nothing on the table,” she said on CNN.

Feinstein said that a freeze of both its nuclear program and missile arsenal, rather than ending them, would be more palatable to North Korea and to China, who fears the U.S. goal is toppling Kim.

The United States still wants a peaceful solution and has been waiting for the North Koreans to indicate they are ready to talk, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

“We have tried a couple of times to signal to them that we’re ready, when they’re ready,” he said. “And they have responded with more missile launches and a nuclear test.”

North Korea threatens harsh response if new sanctions imposed

 North Korea says it will make the United States pay a heavy price if a proposal Washington is backing to impose the toughest sanctions ever on Pyongyang is approved by the U.N. Security Council this week.

The North’s Foreign Ministry issued a statement early Monday saying it is watching the United States’ moves closely and threatened it is “ready and willing” to respond with measures of its own.

The United States has called for a vote Monday, New York time, on new U.N. sanctions against North Korea.

Last Tuesday, the U.S. circulated a draft resolution proposing the toughest-ever U.N. sanctions on North Korea, including a ban on all oil and natural gas exports to the country and a freeze on all foreign financial assets of the government and its leader, Kim Jong Un.

Security Council diplomats, who weren’t authorized to speak publicly because talks have been private, said the U.S. and China were still negotiating the text late Sunday.

Previous U.N. sanctions resolutions have been negotiated between the United States and China, and have taken weeks or months. But the Trump administration is demanding a vote in six days.

“The U.S. is trying to use the DPRK’s legitimate self-defensive measures as an excuse to strangle and completely suffocate it,” the statement said, using the acronym for North Korea’s formal name. “Since the U.S. is revealing its nature as a blood-thirsty beast obsessed with the wild dream of reversing the DPRK’s development of the state nuclear force which has already reached the completion phase, there is no way that the DPRK is going to wait and let the U.S. feast on it.”

North Korea conducted its sixth nuclear test a week ago and has been launching ballistic missiles at a record pace. Both are violations of U.N. resolutions, but Pyongyang claims it must carry them out to build nuclear deterrent against what it sees as U.S. aggression.

Undaunted by the international criticism of its test, which Pyongyang says was of a hydrogen bomb, Pyongyang celebrated through the weekend, with concerts and banquets for the country’s nuclear scientists and engineers.

Blocking textile exports and cutting off the flow of oil from China would potentially be crippling measures. North Korea gets nearly all of its oil supply from China, with a much smaller amount coming from Russia or the open market.

According to a recent study by the Nautilus Institute think tank, a massive cutback in the flow of oil from China would definitely hurt the North Korean economy, and especially average citizens. But the report said the impact would likely be blunted on the military, which probably has enough fuel stockpiled to continue normal operations for the immediate future.

Russian President Vladimir Putin recently expressed doubt over whether sanctions are an effective means of getting the North to stop its missile and nuclear testing, and China, harboring similar concerns, has repeatedly hesitated in the past to fully support U.S. sanction plans.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Sunday also stressed the importance of diplomacy and offered to act as a facilitator if needed.

“If our participation in talks is wanted, I will say yes immediately,” she said in an interview with the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung newspaper that was published Sunday.

The five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany conducted long-running talks with Iran that led to a 2015 deal for international sanctions to be lifted in exchange for Tehran curbing its nuclear activities.

“I could also imagine such a format to settle the North Korea conflict,” she said.

Trump’s threat a ‘load of nonsense,’-North Korea’s

North Korea’s military has called President Donald Trump’s threat warning of “fire and fury” a “load of nonsense.”

In a statement released today through the Korean Central News Agency, a state-run media outlet, Gen. Kim Rak Gyom, commander of the Strategic Force of the Korean People’s Army, said Trump’s comments fail to grasp the ongoing situation, calling the U.S. president a “guy bereft of reason” and saying he is “extremely getting on the nerves” of the country’s army. Only absolute force can work on him,” the statement reads.

The statement added that the country is still examining a possible strike on waters near Guam “to signal a crucial warning to the U.S.” North Korea previously said Tuesday in response to Trump’s remarks it was considering a strike on the U.S. territory in the western Pacific that would create “an enveloping fire.” Guam is home to a key Air Force base.

The statement concluded by saying that the country will be “closely watching the speech and behavior of the U.S.”

Speaking from Bedminster, New Jersey, on Tuesday, Trump used strong language to caution North Korea against making any further threats against the U.S.

“North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen. He has been very threatening — beyond a normal statement — and as I said, they will be met with fire, fury and, frankly, power the likes of which the world has never seen before,” Trump said, referring to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

On Wednesday, U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis added to the increasingly heated rhetoric, urging North Korea’s leader to “take heed” of the United Nations Security Council’s “unified voice,” referring to recent sanctions issued against the nation. Mattis also called for the country to “cease any consideration of actions that would lead to the end of its regime and the destruction of its people.”

Members of the U.S. intelligence community believe that North Korea’s nuclear capabilities may be more advanced than initially thought and the country might have developed the technology to miniaturize a nuclear warhead so it can be placed inside an intercontinental ballistic missile, a U.S. official told ABC News on Tuesday. The Washington Post first reported the news, citing a July 28 report by the Defense Intelligence Agency about North Korea’s capabilities.

Trump Following Hitler’s Path- North Korea

Trump ‘can’t meet with Kim Jong Un’-Condoleezza Rice

Trump administration explores possible military force to combat North Korea threat

War: North Korea Places Army On Standby

 North Korea said its military is “only waiting for the command to launch,” less than a week after test-firing midrange ballistic missilesinto the sea.

Pyongyang propaganda outlet DPRK Today said Tuesday, local time, the United States and South Korea are escalating tensions, and the alleged threats have placed the entire People’s Army on standby, South Korean news service Newsis reported.

“At present the People’s Army soldiers cannot repress the rising anger in the face of the U.S. and South Korean military aggressors, who are spreading tensions from a West Sea hot spot to the Han River Estuary.”

North Korea did not provide further details, but it’s likely DPRK Today was referring to United Nations Command actions in South Korean waters in mid-June.

The U.N. Command had conducted a joint action, deploying a military police unit and four speedboats near the border with North Korea, in order to evict Chinese boats fishing illegally in South Korea and neutral waters.

The North Korean propaganda outlet also included photographs of the Hwasong-10 ballistic missile launch, which ran with the statement, “Words are never understood by invaders.”

“We have the clear capability to realistically attack the enemy within the Pacific Operations Zone,” Pyongyang said in its statement.

The Hwasong-10 is also known as the Musudan missile, known to have a range between 1,800 and 2,500 miles.

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